Old Fellas New Music Episode 31 Notes

This week’s poster

We are back again this week on Friday at 4:00 PM. Certainly hoping for fewer tech glitches, but all things considered, it was OK.

You can hear last week’s show here on Mixcloud https://www.mixcloud.com/paul-mcguire3/
This week we have another great setup.

The Beths – Knees Deep
Orville Peck, Shania Twain – Legends Never Die
Glorious Sons – Pink Motel
Blue Stones – Shakin’ Off the Dust
Blue Rodeo – When You Were Wild
Crystal Eyes – 2000 years
Rosie Tucker – Barbara Ann
Sudan Archives – Selfish Soul
Cheap Trick – So it Goes

Our latest show on Mixcloud

Here are some notes that will grow as we get closer to the show.
The Beths – Knees Deep

Beths  – Knees Deep

New Zealand indie rockers The Beths have already released 2 albums of snappy power pop.  Their latest is  Expert in a Dying Field,  from which Knees Deep is the lead-off single.

It’s a peppy,  tune about trying to summon personal courage. In the song’s video, various Beths blow off band practice to go bungee jumping.  It’s included here in a review of the song from Consequence Sound

In a press release, Beths leader Liz Stokes has this to say:    “I’m the kind of person who wants to go swimming but takes like 10 minutes to get all the way into the cold water, slowly and painfully. I hate this about myself and am kind of envious of people who can just jump straight in the deep end. In a shocking twist, this is also a metaphor?! For how I wish I was the kind of person who was”

Here’s a nice interview regarding their latest release.   https://greatdarkwonder.com/interview-blue-rodeo-many-a-mile/

Glorious Sons – Pink Motel

Kingston Ontario’s The Glorious Sons have achieved remarkable success scoring the Juno for top rock album 3 times and having 2 number 1 hits in the US Billboard Charts.

Pink Motel is the closing track on their 2019 release A War On Everything. The song has very early 70’s Stones vibe to it.  This is a clip of them performing the song at Queen’s University’s Richardson Stadium in hometown Kingston in 2019.


Orville Peck, Shania Twain – Legends Never Die

Orville Peck and Shania Twain

I don’t know anything about Orville Peck, but I will work on this. Everyone knows Shania Twain and her story is worth reading about. This is a woman with a great amount of courage and it is really great to see her in my ‘duets section’ for this week.

I am adding this track on Karen’s suggestion. She is coming to see them this week at Cityfolk here in Ottawa. This is a great duet, you really need to give it a listen.

Blue Stones – Shakin’ Off the Dust
Here is a band that I was only vaguely aware of before Cityfolk. This is a two-person band from Windsor and their music is powerful. The band consists of a drummer and a guitarist. I could have chosen any of their tracks, but I stuck to the show format and chose Shakin’ Off the Dust.

a little grainy, but taken live at CityFolk

I had to add the video for this track, a little strange

Blue Rodeo – When You Were Wild

What can one say about Blue Rodeo?  A Canadian institution since the mid-eighties, Blue Rodeo released their 16th studio album Many A Mile this year. 

When You Were Wild is a Greg Keelor number

Here’s a nice interview regarding their latest release.   https://greatdarkwonder.com/interview-blue-rodeo-many-a-mile/

Crystal Eyes – 2000 years

This track I heard this week off of CBC Radio 3 and I had to add this. I find this is the best way to choose tracks for this show. The song was immediately appealing, now I need to go back and find out a little about who these folks are.

Crystal Eyes

and a little bit about them

Alberta psych-rockers Crystal Eyes are back with a video for their new track, “Don’t Turn Around.”

Today’s release comes from their forthcoming sophomore record, The Sweetness Restored, out April 22nd via Bobo Integral. “Don’t Turn Around” is a brooding track with bold vocal lines, driven percussion, and pulsing synths. The accompanying video for the track comes packed with vintage clips of people parasailing at a picturesque beach.

and this great quote “Crystal Eyes describe the forthcoming album as a “feel-good self-help record for the age of existential dread.”

all from Indi 88 FM

Rosie Tucker – Barbara Ann

Rosie Tucker is an American musician from Los Angeles.  This track is taken from their third and latest album entitled Sucker Supreme.  The album was listed on Pitchfork’s list of “29 Great Records You May Have Missed: Spring 2021

The record opens with one of its finest moments, and “Barbara Ann.” Apparently the song is about Tucker’s grandmother and spending time inside the American monoculture of the Midwest.

The Alternative provides a nice review of the album. https://www.getalternative.com/album-review-rosie-tucker-sucker-supreme/

Sudan Archives – Selfish Soul

This music has a really unique sound. I did look up something about Sudan Archives and her music is influenced by Sudanese violin style.

Here is an excerpt from her website

Sudan Archives is a violinist and vocalist who writes, plays, and produces her own music. Drawing inspiration from Sudanese fiddlers, she is self-taught on the violin, and her unique songs also fold in elements of R&B, experimental electronic music, and beat-making. She signed to Stones Throw Records in 2017.

Sudan Archives grew up in Cincinnati where she “messed around with instruments in the house” and took up violin in the fourth grade, teaching herself how to play the instrument by ear. When she discovered the violin playing style of Northeast Africa her eyes opened to the possibilities of the instrument.

Here is an early video from 2016 when she was just starting out

Sudan Archives – Queen Kunta
In this live performance video, she flips Kendrick Lamar’s “King Kunta” with just her voice, a violin and a loop pedal.
Video and photo by Eric Coleman. Cameras: Mike Park, Dominic Macias, Chris Gutierrez and Eric Coleman. Editor: Laith Majali. Special Thanks to Red Gate Recorders.

Cheap  Trick – So it Goes

Cheap Trick is an American rock band from Rockford, Illinois, that originally formed in 1973. In 1978 Bob and his brother bought Cheap Trick’s third album, Heaven Tonight.  After that it was only a matter of time before they went and got the first two albums as well.  The band seemed to bridge the gap between new wave, power pop and grand stadium rock. They  exploded in popularity in 1979 with The Live at Budokan album.  Here’s the poster from when at their height, they played the Montreal Forum.  (Paul See attachment)

After more mainstream and less interesting releases in the 80’s their output became more sporadic. However this track come from their 20th lp  which became their first #1 record.

Also, a blog Bob follows Burning Wood loved it as well.  https://burnwoodtonite.blogspot.com/search?q=CHEAP+TRICK

Here’s a comparison- Cheap Trick 1977  

vs. Cheap Trick 2021   

You be the judge…

Here is the updated Spotify Playlist

Our Playlist is up to 31 shows now!

A Broadcast for July 1st in Canada – Old Fellas New Music Episode 15

LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT – we are broadcasting from unceded Algonquin Anishinaabe territory

Week 15 – July 1st Track List

Link for all our shows – https://www.mixcloud.com/paul-mcguire3/

Tracklist and contributors

Sequence

  1. Classified – Powerless  (Bob)
  2. Buffy Ste Marie – You’ve Got to Run (Spirit of the Wind) (Bob)
  3.  iskwe & Tom Wilson – Blue Moon Drive (Karen)
  4. Greg Keelor – Black Feather (Karen)
  5. The Jerry Cans – Northern lights (Andrea)
  6. Snotty Nose Rez Kids – The Warriors (Andrea)
  7.  Jeremy Dutcher –  Eqpahak (Steve)
  8. Lido Pimienta – Nada (Mairi)
  9. Piqsiq – Arctic Hallows (Claire)
  10.  Ms.PANIK – Open Hearts (Claire)
  11.  Jeremy Dutcher  – Mehcinut (Debbie)Emma Stevens – Blackbird (Youtube recording)(Heather) (pronounced MEH-jin-nud)
  12.  Gord Downey – “The Stranger” (Heather)
  1.  Rose Cousins – The Benefits of being Alone (Colleen)
  1.  Ahead By a Century – The Jerry Cans (Liam)
  2. Julian Taylor- “The Ridge” (Beth)
  3. Marito Marques – Manjerico (Paul)
  4. Leanne Betasamosake Simpson – I Pity the Country (Paul)

Our updated Playlist


Classified – Powerless

selection by Bob

According to Classified, whose real name is Luke Boyd, the song, titled “Powerless,” is drawn from the experiences of multiple people who’ve reached out to the Nova Scotia musician.

Premiere: Classified’s ‘Powerless’ music video is an incredible ode to missing and murdered Indigenous women

Justin Chandler · CBC Music · Posted: Apr 04, 2018 12:00 AM ET | Last Updated: April 9, 2019

Classified’s new music video for ‘Powerless’ focuses on the missing and murdered Indigenous women of Canada. (Screenshot from ‘Powerless,’ by Classified)

When rapper Classified released his new single “Powerless” two weeks ago, he wrote an impassioned post on his Facebook that concluded: “We need to speak up for these kids … don’t let them feel powerless.”

The track was inspired by responses Classified received when he posted about the news of a Newfoundland man who was sentenced to five years in prison for the rape of an 11-year-old girl. “I thought it was unbelievable,” he said, explaining his outrage towards the case, which led to his post on social media. As a result, he began writing “Powerless” to give a voice to children and women who have experienced abuse.

CBC April 4, 2018

Buffy Ste Marie – You’ve Got to Run (Spirit of the Wind)

Selection by Bob

You Got to Run (Spirit of the Wind)” was inspired by champion dogsled racer George Attla, who competed in the inaugural Iditarod dog sled race in 1973 and whose story was the subject of 1979 film Spirit of the Wind.

Buffy Sainte-Marie & Tanya Tagaq “You Got To Run (Spirit Of The Wind)”

For further exploration,  try premier reissue label Light in the Attic’s compilation “Native North America (Vol. 1): Aboriginal Folk, Rock, and Country 1966–1985.”  The following review from Pitchfork appears to hit the nail right on the head.  

Native North America (Vol. 1): Aboriginal Folk, Rock, and Country 1966–1985

Native North America (Vol. 1): Aboriginal Folk, Rock, and Country 1966–1985 features artists from all over Canada combining Native American culture and popular music. The tracklist has been carefully curated to not only to emphasize the diversity of the artists and their ideas, but to reveal the vibrancy and energy of this large and largely undocumented scene.

Pitchfork Magazine

and a video about the compilation – pretty interesting

Light In The Attic Docs Presents – Native North America (Vol. 1)

you can purchase the collection here

Also worth viewing is Rumble:The Indians Who Rocked the World.   

RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World – Official Trailer

iskwe & Tom Wilson – Blue Moon Drive

selection and notes by Karen

Tom Wilson and Iskwe- Blue Moon Drive

Tom Wilson-  I saw and heard him sing with Iskwe on an online music show during covid and I was so impressed by his stories and their beautiful voices which sound so great together.

He is a 62 year old Canadian rock musician from Hamilton Ont. whose career has included work in Blues, rock, psychedlic folk and folk you may have heard him as he has also been a major part of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings, Junkhouse and Lee Harvey Osmond along with members of the Cowboy Junkies and Skydiggers

He had a rough and tumble life, battled demons and addictions -with music and visual arts being a real life saver for him

He was raised by his great aunt and uncle but only recently found out that the woman he thought of as his cousin was actually his mother who is part Mohawk.  His father was also Mohawk but Wilson didn’t learn of his Mohawk heritage until quite recently.

Tom was commissioned by the city of Hamilton to paint a mural depicting the history of music in that city and he has published a memoir in 2017 titled Beautiful Scars which discusses his discovery of his Mohawk heritage

His son Thompson Wilson is also a musician (formerly part of Harlan Pepper ) and they have toured together 

Tom Wilson is very interested in learning more about and sharing his Mohawk culture. He partnered up with Ojibway trumpeter Chuck Copenace who sprinkles his notes, fluttering in the air, in space, and contributing a different breath to song and with 

Iskwe( who has been featured on your podcast previously) whose name means blue sky woman- is an artist and creator and communicator of music and movements, pictures, poetry and prose.  She’s a teller of stories that impacted our past and will inform our future.  She has 3 albums and has performed 100s of shows in Canada and internationally and has been nominated for a Juno. She has a Cree- Metis background from Treaty One Territory who was born and raised in Winnipeg. She refers to herself as an urban indigenous 2-spirited woman from Red River Valley.

The single Blue Moon Drive is an incredible collaboration of 3 amazing artists, a celebration of 4 Indegenous nations uniting together to celebrate their art.

Greg Keelor – Black Feather

selection and notes by Karen

Greg Keelor – Black Feather (Official Lyric Video)

Most of you know him from Blue Rodeo fame but he also has 6 solo albums with the most recent one- Share the Love- coming out during the pandemic.

Greg had a studio version of the songs ready to go when the pandemic hit and decided to record them live in a community centre near Rice Lake with the same musicians.  He actually liked the live version but both albums are available for purchase.

Greg says that writing songs is how he deals with “stuff”.  He had recently lost a dear mother-like figure and his girlfriend of 5 years left and he was feeling rudderless.  His good friend, Frank, who is Cree and from Saskatchewan invited Greg to go to a sweat lodge to pray and he realized Frank’s prayers were all about gratitude- thanking everyone and everything, sun, moon, everything.  Frank had brought his pipe, sage and eagle feather and did a smoke ceremony and Greg felt relief for the first time in months.

During that same period, he visited Waskaganish Reserve in James Bay for a gig with Blue Rodeo and he felt a kindred connection to the place.  The album grew out of a desire to get away somewhere and be isolated and think.  He spent more time there and his friend Charlie Hester ( the director of culture, sports, leisure and tourism for the Cree nation of Waskaganish) took him on a tour of the community which Greg found to be healing in its own way- big beautiful landscape and generous and kind people. Greg had a lot of questions about the pipeline and other Indigenous issues across Canada and he found it a great place to gather his thoughts.

While there he saw a piece of art on the side of a local radio station and it said “Share the Love” on the front of a teepee with a heart in the centre.  He found out it was there to honour the life of deceased resident- Claudia Stephen – who had shown many acts of love and kindness in the community and had passed away too soon.  Greg obtained permission from Claudia’s family to use the design on his album covers as he was so touched by the 15 ft by 15 ft wall art in her memory.

A combination of his loss along with the generosity of spirit he found in Waskaganish and the example set by Claudia and the love the people had for her energized Keelor from his melancholy.  Behind melancholy and sorrow and hardship, there is a river of love or energy that unites everybody and he felt that connection in James Bay very strongly.

Share the Love is a paradox of an album both reflective and uplifting and perfect for the times.  Even though we are all isolated, we are all connected. There are many references to feathers on this album and their association with freedom, transcendence and communication with spiritual realms.

The Jerry Cans – Northern lights

selection and notes by Andrea

The Jerry Cans

Shortly after Gord Downie passed away,  I heard The Jerry Cans perform “Ahead by a Century” in Inuktitut. Having taught in an Inuit community, I loved hearing a familiar song performed in this beautiful language. The Jerry Cans are a band from Iqaluit, Nunavut. They combine traditional Inuit throat singing with folk music and rock. Their music is largely written in Inuktitut. “Northern Lights” incorporates throat singing and captures the power of the breath-taking land of the Arctic.

The Jerry Cans – Northern Lights

  Snotty Nose Rez Kids – The Warriors

Selection and notes by Andrea

Snotty Nose Rez Kids

I first heard Snotty Nose Rez Kids during an interview with  Eden Robinson, the Haisla and Heiltsuk author of Monkey Beach. They are a Haisla hip hop duo composed  of rappers Darren “Young D” Metz and Quinton “Yung Trybez” Nyce.  “Warriors” is a protest song as part of a benefit album for The Tiny House Warriors, a group that is fighting the Kinder Morgan TransMountain pipeline expansion into Secwepemc Territory in British Columbia, Canada.

                              


 Eqpahak by Jeremy Dutcher

Selection by Steve Ferracuti- family friend who is hunkering down in Nova Scotia having finally been able to pierce the Atlantic Bubble and see his new grandson, Fred, and 2-year old, Flo.

 

Aik pa HUK – where the tide stops Passamaquoddy-Maliseet Language

It is hard to know whether and what to celebrate and how to combine this with mourning. I don’t know how we approach all this apart from bringing a sense of humility and respect for our indigenous people and also a sense that these are present issues, not only historical ones, and I hope that we can also bring a sense of real responsibility to all of this. One little tiny part of the “answer” is the theme to this song, that is the songs. I thought it appropriate to celebrate that.

Lido Pimienta – Nada

selection by Mairi

Piqsiq – Artic Hallows – from their 2020 Album TAAQTUQ UBLURIAQ

selections by Claire

2 songs I chose:

1 – I have always been captivated by throat singing. Throat singing, katajjaq, ka TA jjaq was banned in the 20thcentury among many other Inuit traditions when Christian Missionaries went North. They believed throat singing was ‘Satanic’. The ban was only lifted in the 1980s. Watching a duet live has always given me goosebumps and is a beautiful tradition to be celebrated, not oppressed. Listening to throat singing is a reminder of the strength of the Inuit culture and their resilience. I am happy to share a song by this group named Piqsiq. The group consists of 2 sisters, Tiffany Kuliktana Ayalik and Kayley Inuksuk Mackay, with roots in Nunavut’s Kitikmeot and Kivalliq Regions, the sisters grew up in Yellowknife, NWT. They perform ancient traditional songs and eerie new compositions. 

 

Ms.PANIK – Open Hearts from her 2018 Album Open Hearts 

Another artist who is new to me is from the West Coast, Ms.PANIK. I was drawn to her beautiful voice, her mesmerizing musical loops and powerful lyrics. She lives in Tofino and the ancestral lands of the klaw-OH-kwee-awt Nation  and is originally from the unceded Territory of the (Haida) Nation and member of the southern Kaayahl Laanaas Clan. Tla-o-qui-aht

An additional note from Claire

I wanted to share two artists that didn’t make the list because of the year cut-off. I thought you could hold onto them and add them to another show. Thank you again for organizing this episode. I truly enjoyed the process of consciously looking for Indigenous artists and love discovering new music. 


Cris Derksen – Hindsight 20/20 – from the 2010 Album ‘the cusp’. Cris Derksen is from Alberta and is an Indigenous cellist and composer.  


Digging Roots – Hwy 17 – from the 2014 Album ‘For The Light’. This song was written to raise awareness about the MMIWG and is a call to action. 


Debbie   – Claire’s mom who works actively in reconciliation in the Ottawa community and across Canada.

I would love to hear almost anything from Jeremy Dutcher 

Maybe ‘Mehcinut’ – first song on his album (pronounced MEH-jin-nud)

 I first heard Jeremy Dutcher about 4-5 years ago on CBC when I was driving somewhere. I had to pull over. My eyes filled with tears at his powerful voice,  the haunting sounds and the voices from the past captured on wax cylinders. I told everyone about him.  His music still stirs something deep within me. So thanks for playing one of his pieces today.


Blackbird sing by high school student, Emma Stevens, in Mi’qmaw, 2019

selections by Heather


Adapted from Paul McCartney’s song, re-written in Mi’kmaq to bring awareness to indigenous languages in 2019, International Year of Indigenous Languages.

Sung by Emma Stevens, performed by students at Allison Bernard Memorial High School in Eskasoni, Cape Breton.

“The Stranger” from Secret Path, Gord Downey, 2016

I chose “The Stranger” by Gord Downie as my second piece. It tells the story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year old boy who escaped from the Kenora residential school to make the 600 km journey home back to his family and never made it. He was found by the railroad tracks. This happened on 1966 and was actually reported on in 1967 by Macleans. Here is Downie’s introduction, better said:

 Mike Downie introduced me to Chanie Wenjack; he gave me the story from Ian Adam’s Maclean’s magazine story dating back to February 6, 1967, “The Lonely Death of Charlie Wenjack.”

Chanie was a young boy who died on October 22, 1966, walking the railroad tracks, trying to escape from the Cecilia Jeffrey Indian Residential School to walk home. Chanie’s home was 400 miles away. He didn’t know that. He didn’t know where it was, nor know how to find it, but, like so many kids – more than anyone will be able to imagine – he tried. I never knew Chanie, the child his teachers misnamed Charlie, but I will always love him.

I have always wondered why, even as a kid, I never thought of Canada as a country – It’s not a popular thought; you keep it to yourself – I never wrote of it as so. The next hundred years are going to be painful as we come to know Chanie Wenjack and thousands like him – as we find out about ourselves, about all of us – but only when we do can we truly call ourselves, “Canada.”

Downie’s music and Lemire’s illustrations inspired The Secret Path, an animated film broadcast by CBC in an hour-long commercial-free television special in Sunday, October 23.

I used the book – illustrated by Jeff Lamire and the video in my grade 7 and 8 classes. In 2017, I had the opportunity to hear Gord Downie and Chaney’s sisters, Pearl and Daisy, sing an Ojibwe – Anishinaabe blessing.

Rose Cousins – The Benefits of Being Alone, 2020

selection by Colleen

a video about Rose Cousins. She mentioned that hers was the last concert we saw before the pandemic changed everything.

Rose Cousins – The Benefits Of Being Alone (Live on eTown)

 

Ahead By a Century – The Jerry Cans

selection by Liam

The Jerry Cans are a band out of Iqaluit, who combine traditional Inuit throat singing with folk music and country rock. The band’s music is written mostly in Inuktitut, and reflects “the challenges and beauty of life in the far north.” The band had local success, but their popularity began to grow after Tanya Tagac won the Polaris prize in 2014 and gave prominence to Inuit throat singing. The band’s name comes from the band trying to rig up a drum set out of jerry cans.

I chose this cover of Ahead by a Century because it reminded me of a couple of things. First, the Jerry Cans and other artists are bringing Inuit music to the forefront, and reminding us that Canada or Turtle Island has many different languages, each of which should be celebrated. Second, this song feels like a bit of a bridge. Ahead by a Century was the last song played in concert by Gord Downie and the Hip. In that same concert, Gord called on us as Canadians to inform ourselves about the ongoing impact of colonialism on Indigenous peoples, and “figure it out.” To me, this song is an ode to Gord and the Hip, but a bridge towards an expanse of Canadian music beyond our traditional understanding, and a reminder of our collective responsibilities towards the process of truth and reconciliation in our country. 

Julian Taylor- “The Ridge”

selection by Beth

Julian Taylor started out with Staggered Crossing, a band he formed while still in high school in the mid 90’s. They were fairly successful playing around clubs in his hometown Toronto. They were classified as rock music. In the early 2000’s he formed the Julian Taylor Band which is hard to classify as it mixed many genres but was still within the realms of rock. With his very different introspective 2020 album, The Ridge (of which I chose the title song), he writes about his Black and Indigenous roots. The song The Ridge speaks about this as he reminisces about his childhood and the family members who formed his sense of identity. “The ridge is like a cut- a divide, in half, of me- not only from an emotional standpoint but also from a social standpoint as a Black and Indigenous person growing up in a predominantly white experience .”

Marito Marques – Manjerico

selections by Paul

Hailing from Portugal, Marito Marques is a Grammy, Latin Grammy and Juno nominee drummer and producer, he takes the sounds of the world into his soul to produce melodies that bring the audience together in an unparalleled unity. Born July 11, 1987 in Arganil, Portugal, Marito began playing the drums at the age of 2, quickly moving on to live performances, including television appearances at 5 years old. Marques pursued his formal instruction at CETM in Coimbra, Portugal. Afterward, Marques moved to New York City to further his studies at the Drummers’ Collective and later at the Manhattan School of Music where he studied under some of the best instructors the school had to offer, including John Riley, Kendrick Scott, Ignacio Berroa or Greg Hutchinson.

Currently living in Toronto, Marques is considered one of the most requested and versatile drummers and producers in Europe and Canada, having performed World Tours with artists in the most diverse music genres; some of which include two Grammy Winners Ivan Lins and Carlos do Carmo, Camane, the Grammy nominees Helik Hadar, Adonis Puentes, Hilario Duran and Jeff Coffin, Anna Maria Jopek, Mino Cinelu. Larnell Lewis, Gregoire Maret, The Wilderness of Manitoba, Sara Tavares, Jesse Cook etc.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

I Pity the Country – Theory of Ice 

 Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is a renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist, who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Her work breaks open the intersections between politics,  story and song—bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity.

A Note on Leanne’s Familythis I had to include, it is amazing how many hurdles Indigenous people have had to go through just to keep their own status!

Leanne’s grandmother, Audrey Williamson (nee Franklin) was born in Alderville First Nation in 1925, and moved to Peterborough, Ontario at the age of three, as her Dad and Leanne’s Great Grandfather, Hartley Franklin, previously a fishing guide on Rice Lake got a job in town building canoes. Leanne’s grandmother regained her Indian Status under Bill C-31 at the same time as her mom, Dianne Simpson (nee Williamson) in the early 1990s. Leanne and her sisters, Shannon, Ansley,  and several of their cousins, regained their Indian Status under Bill C-3 after the bill became law in 2011, and their children regained their status after Bill S-3 became law in 2019. They are all off reserve band members of Alderville First Nation. Leanne was born and raised by her mom Dianne and her dad Barry, who is of Scottish ancestry, in Wingham, Ontario.

The lyrics to a very powerful song

I pity the country

I pity the state

And the mind of a man

Who thrives on hate

Small are the lives

Of cheats and of buyers

Of bigoted news press

Fascist town criers

Deception annoys me

Deception destroys me

The Bill of Rights throws me

In jails they all know me

Frustrated are churchmen

From saving a soul man

The tinker, the tailor

The colonial governor

They pull and they paw me

They’re seeking to draw me

Away from the roundness

Of the light

[Verse 2]

Silly civil servants

They thrive off my body

Their trip is with power

Backbacon and welfare

Police, they arrest me

Materialists detest me

Pollution, it chokes me

Movies, they joke me

Politicians exploit me

City life, it jades me

Hudson Bay flees me

Hunting laws freak me

Government is bumbling

Revolution is rumbling

To be ruled in impunity

Is tradition continuity

I pity the country

I pity the state

And the mind of a man

Who thrives on hate

Willie Dunn

we have broadcasted from the un-ceded territory of the Algonquin Anishinaabe peoples

Miigwech, thank you