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Questions to ask when considering a 1:1 program – how do we respond at our school?

We are on the cusp of starting a limited 1:1 program at our school.  As we prepare, it is important to consider al sorts of questions – as we prepare, I want to consider answers to questions asked by Ann McMullan in the article:

The 10 questions to ask before you start your one-to-one program

McMullan shared 5 start factors that are keys to success for one-to-one programs:

  1. Start with “Why?” What are instructional goals you hope to accomplish?
  2. Start small, think big. “Find some of those teacher leaders and let them try out the devices,” she said. “Find out what the issues are with the network. But do think big; it becomes an equity issue very quickly.”
  3. Start with teachers first. It’s critical.
  4. Start the conversation across all departments.
  5. Do start: Go for it. Failure is part of the learning process.

We have been getting closer and closer to 1:1 especially at the junior level all year.  The key point for us is the teachers.  We have a group that is willing to experiment and learn.  We have had several group PD sessions during and after the school day to work on our understanding on how various apps – especially Google Apps can improve student learning.  We have had great results with Read and Write and are learning how to give more effective feedback with Kaizena. We are learning more about digital portfolios.  We are also learning new ways to deliver PD to staff.  For our last PD venture, we invited a teacher from our partner school to spend the day with teachers and classes to work on digital portfolios.  Having an experienced teacher with us in the classroom made a huge difference.

The conversation continues.  Within the next ten days we should have enough Chromebooks for all the junior (grade 4,5,6) students.  Each student will receive a machine and will be expected to bring the Chromebook home every night.  Our partner school is following the same process.

According to McMullan, here are the top 10 questions schools should ask themselves, and the order they should ask them in:

  • What is the mission of the district and how does the one-to-one program align with it?

We are very fortunate to work in a district that is flexible and open to change.  Years ago, the school board created the conditions for innovation by providing every school with a reliable wifi network.  Each year, we receive more devices from the school board.  For a small school like ours, it is now possible to take the final leap to make sure that every junior student has a new Chromebook to work with.  We also were early adopters of Google which has been huge for us.  Every staff member and every student has their own Google account.  Everyone has equal access to all Google apps.

  • What are instructional goals that will be supported by a one-to-one program?

We have examined our School Improvement Plan to see what goals already exist that can be supported by our 1:1 program.  We have been putting an emphasis on feedback for the past few years.  Kaizena is a very effective feedback tool that if used properly and consistently will advance our ability to give effective feedback to our students.  We also have a very high ELL population.  Apps like Read and Write can be very effective in assisting ELL students move ahead with their reading comprehension and writing skills.  This applies as well to students with learning disabilities.  When distributing our machines, we have focused first on our LD and ELL students.  We have observed some significant gains in their learning based on their day to day use of the Chromebook.

  • How will all major departments, selected administrative and teaching staff, parents, and other stakeholders be involved in the planning and implementation of a one-to-one program?

For us, the key ‘departments’ for implementation have been resource (Learning Disabilities) and ELL (English Language Learners).  Our resource and ELL staff have worked with teachers and students to teach them how to use the Chromebook.  Resource especially has become a center of innovation where students have been well trained on how to use apps.  They in turn have taught their school mates how to use the same apps

  • What device will best meet the mission? (“Notice, that’s not the first question,” McMullan said.)

This depends on the grade level.  We have more iPads at the primary and kindergarten level and more chromebooks at the junior level.  Now however, we are finding that we need more Chromebooks in the primary classes so students can get acquainted to Google apps and how to use their Google accounts.

  • How will the one-to-one program be financed and sustained?

Sustaining the program will be interesting.  We think that once we have made the initial investment, our regular IT allotment will be used to replace older or defective equipment.  The key factor is making the initial investment.

  • What IT systems need to be in place to support and maintain our one-to-one program(s)? (Here, McMullan shared an anecdote about one district that purchased 20,000 Chromebooks, only to have them sit in boxes because there was no wireless access in classrooms).

We have the wireless access and this system will actually be enhanced and strengthened in the near future.  All machines purchased through the school board are supported by IT technicians employed by the board.  As more schools go 1:1 the board may need to look at more IT support, but at this point we are able to access IT support to assist us when we need it.

  • How will district and school administrators and board members be prepared to lead and communicate the vision?

There is value in starting small.  The current implementation plan involves only two schools.  I am not convinced tat 1:1 should be implemented across the entire school board.  You definitely need a willing staff and school leadership willing to take the 1:1 leap before you even consider moving in this direction.  The human factor is easily the most important thing to consider before going 1:1.  Staff and school leadership need to be working together and share the common vision that going 1:1 will improve student achievement.

  • What ongoing professional development strategies will be provided?

This is probably one of the biggest questions.  On-going embedded PD is crucial.  The PD has to continue throughout the year and it can’t depend on teachers ‘volunteering’ to learn more about the newest app.  It is crucial that 1:1 implementation be a major component of the School Improvement Plan and that the school’s PD budget (release time) be devoted to staff development.  It is also important that staff be consulted – always – on what they need to learn next.  This shows basic respect for the adult learner and ensures that staff will buy into the learning plan for the year.

  • What processes will be in place for making adjustments as needed?

Good communication is the key.  The principal must be open to the ideas and thoughts of staff and staff need to feel supported enough by the administration so they can talk freely about how the program is going.  As mentioned earlier, the human factor is the most important, we need to keep in constant contact with each other and learn together.  There will be bumps along the way, but teachers are good at change; all we need to do is manage it carefully.

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Time to go 1:1 with Chromebooks

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We are taking the leap into 1:1.  We are close to this already at the junior level (grades 4,5,6) and we feel it is time to move to a Chromebook for every student.

Today, we have put in an order for 20 more Chromebooks.  This is an experiment we are taking part in with another school with similar demographics to ours.

My job will be to offer staff all the support they need to help this work.  I am already working on more PD sessions that I hope will help the  teachers adapt to a 1:1 environment.

Once the machines arrive, each student will be assigned a machine.  The students will then have to take the machines home and bring them back the next day.  Not bringing a machine to school will easily be the equivalent of not doing your homework.  I have also purchased six more tech tubs to help with storage.

Having the machines at home is really important for us.  Many of our students do not have computers at home and it is difficult for us to extend the learning going on at school if students have limited or no access to computers.

We will probably make mistakes, but we will learn together.  There are lots of good articles out there from people who have already gone down this road – we will take our direction from those who have gone before us.

I will use this blog to document how we do.  I really believe this initiative will bring about significant change in the way we teach at our school.  Now it is time to find out!

Here are some of the articles I will be re-reading:

Devices Need to Support Learning – 

Technology can close achievement gaps, improve learning – Stanford University

Five Steps for Implementing a Successful 1:1 Environment – Edutopia

Why 1:1? Why Chromebooks? 

The Logistics of 1:1 Chromebooks at Leyden

 (really important article – note the date 2012!)

Teachers Manual to a Paperless Classroom – Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

My Livebinder Collection on 1:1

Click here to open this binder in a new window.

http://livebinders.com/play/play?id=1351806&present=true

#ecoo13 session 3 Google Chromebook Implementation and Use – A View From 4 Levels: Board CIO, Principal, Teacher & Student Perspectives

This session will look at the implementation and use of Google Chromebooks in the classroom. Mark Carbone, CIO with the WRDSB, will offer a board perspective on Chromebooks, discussing infrastructure, the implementation of board wide wi-fi, supporting a system wide move and what tools are needed for the task. Ed Doadt, Principal at the WRDSB’s Huron Heights Secondary School, will then offer insight from an administration perspective, detailing the background of the board’s Futures Forum Project. He will look at how it has led to a common philosophy and approach based on common strategies, tools and language and touch on how Chromebooks have helped enable this. Andrew Bieronski, a teacher who works under Ed at HHSS in the Futures Forum Project, will then speak to the use of a set of Chromebooks in his classroom. He will look at how their use supports collaboration between teacher and student and also between students themselves. Andrew will offer a breakdown of how the Chromebook compares to similar tools, and highlight how it enables active learning through the use of Google Apps. Lastly, a student from Andrew’s class will join the presentation through video-conferencing and share their perspective on how the use of a Chromebook has supported and improved their learning. This session will be free flowing with time for questions and open discussion, and will build on the introductory session Mark and Ed offered at ECOO last year.

 

chromebook

 

Board implementation

English-Civics and Careers – Futures Forum Project

You need to have the right kind of people at the board level and at the school. You need also to have the right students – either they were picked, or at random, both worked well.  When you have the right kind of people then you can have a successful project.

Use of Chromebooks in the classroom – not a Windows platform.

advantages – everything stored on-line, long battery life (easily up to a day), 8-second start-up, very cheap

 

all programs are cloud-based.  Students can have their own login or login as ‘guest’

More popular than netbooks or iPads!

can also be managed at the board level.  IT can send out updates overnight.

Even if you lose your connection, many of the applications that still work.

Also there are many companies out there that are coming up with applications that work on the cloud, video editing for example can now be done through on-line applications.

As a collaborative tool, the teacher can create shared folders on Drive so that all assignments and work can be stored on Google Drive.

Printing – can connect to another computer to print or airprint model if necessary.

This board (WRDSB)  will be rolling out 60 Chromebooks per school.

Chromebook session

 

 

I would love to get these machines into my school!!